conclusive


conclusive
conclusive, decisive, determinative, definitive are comparable when they mean having or manifesting qualities that bring something to a finish or end.
Conclusive applies most frequently to an argument, evidence, or reasoning that is irrefutable or so convincing that it compels certainty or certitude and puts an end to question or debate concerning a matter
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there is one very convincing text which so strongly supports the tradition that it seems conclusiveBelloc

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a very persuasive if not a conclusive argument— John Marshall

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Decisive (see also DECIDED) applies to something (as an act, event, influence, or argument) that puts an end to controversy or competition, to vacillation, to uncertainty, or to insecurity; it often comes close in meaning to critical
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the decisive battle of the war had not yet been fought

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my words had been decisive. At least they put an end to the discussion— London

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Determinative applies especially to matters (as decisions, judgments, operative causes, or influences) which put an end to uncertainty, wavering, and fluctuation and serve to give a fixed direction, goal, or character (as to a life, a course, or a movement)
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the determinative influence in shaping his career

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an appeal covering similar merchandise is pending . . . which will be determinative of this issue— U. S. Treasury Decisions

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Definitive, which is often opposed to tentative and, sometimes, to provisional, applies to whatever is put forth as final and as serving to make further questioning, dispute, uncertainty, or experiment needless or as serving to put an end to an unsettled state or condition where temporary measures have been necessary
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the decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States are definitive

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a definitive treaty

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a definitive edition of an author's works is one that claims to have said the last word on all textual problems

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not until there is a settled and definitive world order can there be such a thing as a settled and definitive version of human history— Huxley

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Analogous words: convincing, compelling, telling, cogent (see VALID): *certain, inevitable, necessary
Antonyms: inconclusive
Contrasted words: *doubtful, dubious, questionable, problematic: *theoretical, speculative, academic: *plausible, credible, specious

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • conclusive — con·clu·sive adj 1: of, relating to, or being a conclusion 2: putting an end to debate or question esp. by reason of inability to be refuted con·clu·sive·ly adv con·clu·sive·ness n Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster …   Law dictionary

  • Conclusive — Con*clu sive, a. [Cf. F. conclusif.] Belonging to a close or termination; decisive; convincing; putting an end to debate or question; leading to, or involving, a conclusion or decision. [1913 Webster] Secret reasons . . . equally conclusive for… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • conclusive — 1610s, occurring at the end, from Fr. conclusif, from L.L. conclusivus, from conclus , pp. stem of concludere (see CONCLUDE (Cf. conclude)). Meaning definitive, decisive, convincing (putting an end to debate) is from 1640s. Related:… …   Etymology dictionary

  • conclusive — [adj] definite, final absolute, all out*, clear, clinching, cogent, compelling, convincing, deciding, decisive, demonstrative, determinant, determinative, flat out*, incontrovertible, indisputable, irrefragable, irrefrangible, irrefutable,… …   New thesaurus

  • conclusive — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ decisive or convincing. DERIVATIVES conclusively adverb conclusiveness noun …   English terms dictionary

  • conclusive — [kən klo͞o′siv] adj. [LL conclusivus < pp. of L concludere,CONCLUDE] that settles a question; final; decisive conclusively adv. conclusiveness n …   English World dictionary

  • conclusive — adjective Date: 1536 1. of, relating to, or being a conclusion 2. putting an end to debate or question especially by reason of irrefutability • conclusively adverb • conclusiveness noun Synonyms: con …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • conclusive — adj. VERBS ▪ appear, be, seem ADVERB ▪ absolutely ▪ fairly, pretty ▪ They pr …   Collocations dictionary

  • conclusive — con|clu|sive [ kən klusıv ] adjective * conclusive evidence, proof, or information proves that something is true: There is no conclusive evidence to suggest that Mrs. Warner was murdered. The results of this experiment seem pretty conclusive. ─… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • conclusive — [[t]kənklu͟ːsɪv[/t]] ADJ GRADED Conclusive evidence shows that something is certainly true. Her attorneys claim there is no conclusive evidence that any murders took place... Research on the matter is far from conclusive. Derived words:… …   English dictionary


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